History - College of Liberal Arts - Texas A&M University Corpus Christi

Dr. Adam Costanzo

Professional Assistant Professor of History 

U.S. History Survey Coordinator

Contact Information:
 Faculty Center - Rm 274-A
 Mailing Unit - 5814
 Phone: (361) 825-2217
 E-mail: adam.costanzo@tamucc.edu

Dr. Adam Costanzo

AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION:

Colonial and Early Republic American History
Urban History

EDUCATION:

Ph.D., History, University of California, Davis, 2012
B.A., International Studies, American University, 2000

TEACHING PHILOSOPHY:

I believe that college students learn the most when they feel personally engaged with and invested in the topic at hand. For many undergraduates, however, the past can seem like a mere abstraction: a collection of inert facts sprinkled across an orderly timeline. As a scholar and a teacher, it is my goal to help students overturn this passive conception of the past and see history as a set of open questions awaiting interpretation from their generation. In my classes, I present history as an unending argument about the circumstances and meaning of past events, in which historians evaluate new ideas based upon the evidence offered to support them.

PUBLICATIONS:

In progress
I am currently revising my doctoral dissertation, “Federal Town, Local City: Building a Home and a National Capital in Early Washington, DC 1790-1850,” for future publication as a monograph.

Book Reviews
Review of America's First Great Depression: Economic Crisis and Political Disorder after the Panic of 1837 by Alasdair Roberts. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2012. To be published in The Economic History Review, issue 66.4 (November 2013).

RECENT PRESENTATIONS:

“A City Hall for the Nation: Local Architecture and Political Meaning in Early Washington , DC,” UC Davis Interdisciplinary Graduate and Professional Student Symposium, Davis, CA, 2012

“Creating a Grand Capital City One Building at a Time: Local Architecture and Development in Early  Washington, DC, 1791-1814,” DC Historical Studies Conference, Washington, DC, 2011

“The Buildings of Empire: Architecture and the Public Buildings of Jacksonian Washington, DC,” Society for Historians of the Early American Republic Conference, Philadelphia, PA, 2011

“A Poplar Uprising on Pennsylvania Avenue: Thomas Jefferson’s Lombardy Poplar Trees and the  Landscape of Politics in Early Washington, DC,” A public history poster displayed at the UC Davis Interdisciplinary Graduate and Professional Student Symposium, Davis, CA, 2011

“Speculating in Failure: The Federal Government's Efforts to Fund and Create a Federal City on the Potomac, 1790-1801,” Bay Area Seminar in Early American History and Culture, Berkeley, CA, 2011

“Power and Public Property: Urban Land Speculation in Washington, DC, 1790-1802,” Society for Historians of the Early American Republic Conference, Rochester, NY, 2010

PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES AND MEMBERSHIP:

Member, Organization of American Historians
Member, American Historical Association
Member, Society of Historians of the Early American Republic

AWARDS AND FELLOWSHIPS:

University of California, Davis Professors for the Future Fellow, 2010-2011

COURSES OFFERED:

HIST 1301: U.S. History to 1865
HIST 1302: U.S. History since 1865